CUPS - CyLab Usable Privacy and Security Laboratory - Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15213

Passwords

To combat both the inherent and user-induced weaknesses of text-based passwords, administrators and organizations typically institute a series of rules – a password policy – to which users must adhere when choosing a password. There is consensus in the literature that a properly-written password policy can provide an organization with increased security. There is, however, less accord in describing just what such a well-written policy would be, or even how to determine whether a given policy is effective. Although it is easy to calculate the theoretical password space that corresponds to a particular password policy, it is difficult to determine the practical password space. Users may, for example, react to a policy rule requiring them to include numbers in passwords by overwhelmingly picking the same number, or by always using the number in the same location in their passwords. There is little published empirical research that studies the strategies used by actual users under various password policies. In addition, some password policies, while resulting in stronger passwords, may make those passwords difficult to remember or type. This may cause users to engage in a variety of behaviors that might compromise the security of passwords, such as writing them down, reusing passwords across different accounts, or sharing passwords with friends. Other undesirable side effects of particular password policies may include frequently forgotten passwords. In fact, the harm caused by users following an onerously restrictive password policy may be greater than the harm prevented by that policy. In this project, we seek to advance understanding of the factors that make creating and following appropriate password policies difficult, collect empirical data on password entropy and memorability under various password policies, and propose password policy guidelines to simultaneously maximize security and usability of passwords. We also explore the security and usability of some new types of passwords.

iloveyou password 123456 - Lorrie Cranor's TEDxCMU talk on passwords, March 2, 2014.

Richard Shay, Saranga Komanduri, Adam L. Durity, Philip (Seyoung) Huh, Michelle L. Mazurek, Sean M. Segreti, Blase Ur, Lujo Bauer, Nicolas Christin, and Lorrie Faith Cranor. Can long passwords be secure and usable? In CHI 2014: Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, April 2014. ACM. [Video teaser]

M.L. Mazurek, S. Komanduri, T. Vidas, L. Bauer, N. Christin, L.F. Cranor, P.G. Kelley, R. Shay, and B. Ur. Measuring Password Guessability for an Entire University. ACM CCS 2013.

J. Blocki, S. Komanduri, A. Procaccia, and O. Sheffet. 2013. Optimizing password composition policies. In Proceedings of the fourteenth ACM conference on Electronic commerce (EC '13). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 105-122.

P.G. Kelley, S. Komanduri, M.L. Mazurek, R. Shay, T. Vidas, L. Bauer, N. Christin and L.F. Cranor. The impact of length and mathematical operators on the usability and security of system-assigned one-time PINs. USEC 2013.

B. Ur, P.G. Kelley, S. Komanduri, J. Lee, M. Maass, M.L. Mazurek, T. Passaro, R. Shay, T. Vidas, L. Bauer, N. Christin, L.F. Cranor, S. Egelman, and J. Lopez. Helping Users Create Better Passwords. ;login: Vol 37, No. 6, December 2012.

B. Ur, P.G. Kelley, S. Komanduri, J. Lee, M. Maass, M. Mazurek, T. Passaro, R. Shay, T. Vidas, L. Bauer, N. Christin, and L.F. Cranor. How does your password measure up? The effect of strength meters on password creation. USENIX Security 2012.

R. Shay, P.G. Kelley, S. Komanduri, M. Mazurek, B. Ur, T. Vidas, L. Bauer, N. Christin, L.F. Cranor. Correct horse battery staple: Exploring the usability of system-assigned passphrases. SOUPS 2012.

Patrick Gage Kelley, Saranga Komanduri, Michelle L. Mazurek, Rich Shay, Tim Vidas, Lujo Bauer, Nicolas Christin, Lorrie Faith Cranor, Julio Lopez. Guess again (and again and again): Measuring password strength by simulating password-cracking algorithms. 2012 IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy (Oakland) [CyLab Technical Report cmu-cylab-11-008, August 21, 2011.]

Saranga Komanduri, Richard Shay, Patrick Gage Kelley, Michelle L. Mazurek, Lujo Bauer, Nicolas Christin, Lorrie Faith Cranor, and Serge Egelman. Of passwords and people: Measuring the effect of password-composition policies. In CHI 2011: Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, May 2011. CHI 2011 Honorable Mention.

Eiji Hayashi, Jason Hong, and Nicolas Christin. Security through a Different Kind of Obscurity: Evaluating Distortion in Graphical Authentication Schemes. In CHI 2011: Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, May 2011.

Encountering Stronger Password Requirements: User Attitudes and Behaviors. Richard Shay, Saranga Komanduri, Patrick Gage Kelley, Pedro Giovanni Leon, Michelle L. Mazurek, Lujo Bauer, Nicolas Christin and Lorrie Faith Cranor. SOUPS 2010.

Eiji Hayashi, Nicolas Christin, Rachna Dhamija, and Adrian Perrig Use Your Illusion: Secure Authentication Usable Anywhere. In Proceedings of the Fourth Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security (SOUPS'08). Pittsburgh, PA. July 2008

C. Kuo, S. Romanosky, and L. Cranor. Human Selection of Mnemonic Phrase-Based Passwords. In Proceedings of the 2006 Symposium On Usable Privacy and Security, 12-14 July 2006, Pittsburgh, PA.



Security Blanket by Lorrie Faith Cranor, machine quilted, digitally printed cotton fabric, 63.5" x 39", appeared in the February 7 issue of Science Magazine

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